Zoroastrianism

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edward_de_vere
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Zoroastrianism

Post by edward_de_vere » Fri Apr 07, 2017 12:00 pm

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/201704 ... d-the-west

The bête noire in Burroughs' magical universe is the concept of a dualistic universe and its association with monotheism. Both dualism and monotheism have their origins in Persian Zoroastrianism, so I'm surprised that Zoroaster/Zarathustra is seldom if ever mentioned in Burroughs' writings (especially given his interest in another more obscure Persian, Hassan i Sabbah). Instead, Burroughs writes as though Western Christian theology created dualism and monotheism rather than simply inheriting it - doubly wrong since Christianity just inherited this from Judaism (and Manichaeism), while Judaism probably got it from Zoroastrianism.

As the article mentions, Friedrich Nietzsche subverts monotheism and the concept of good versus evil by rewriting history and making Zarathustra a spokesman for Nietzsche's own atheism and power-based moral nihilism. Interestingly enough, Nietzsche never seemed to attract WSB's interest as well - you'd think that (apart from N's atheism) they would be kindred spirits on account of their opposition to traditional morality, their elitism, their irreverence, and their shared general misanthropy and misogyny.

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dheadley
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Re: Zoroastrianism

Post by dheadley » Fri Apr 07, 2017 1:51 pm

I can't see WSB touching Nietzsche....or Heidegger ....with a ten foot pole. Too many fascist/nazi connotations.

edward_de_vere
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Re: Zoroastrianism

Post by edward_de_vere » Fri Apr 07, 2017 8:10 pm

I can't see WSB touching Nietzsche....or Heidegger ....with a ten foot pole. Too many fascist/nazi connotations.
WSB was an admirer of Oswald Spengler's Decline of the West. Spengler was in a sense an intellectual heir to Nietzsche and his writings were an inspiration to the nationalist far right, so I doubt that's the reason WSB avoided Nietzsche. Maybe he just never got around to reading him?

As for Heidegger, the best reason to avoid his books has nothing to do with politics and everything to do with his convoluted, obscure writing style.

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dheadley
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Re: Zoroastrianism

Post by dheadley » Sat Apr 08, 2017 9:02 am

Not sure what it was WSB saw in Spengler's 'Decline of the West'. The title is attractive and it still is required reading. Most Germans were in favour of hegemony in Spengler's day. He later refuted Nazi ideas.

WSB must have known who Nietzsche and Heidegger were and what they represented. Post WW2 it hasn't been a good idea to associate with those characters.

https://ebsn.eu/scholarship/articles/th ... s-library/

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