Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

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BansheeYage
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Name a Burroughs book: Junky

Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

Post by BansheeYage » Sun Jul 03, 2016 3:29 am

http://www.thevinylfactory.com/vinyl-fa ... oundtrack/

Mondo Records has been reissuing David Cronenbergs film soundtracks he did in collaboration with Howard Shore. The reissues include The Brood, Scanners, Dead Ringers, Naked Lunch, and Crash, all with the options of classic black vinyl or specially decorated vinyl in relation to the for corresponding film.

Each record also is reissued with stunning gatefold artwork so I'd recommend obtaining copies while they last. I actually just purchased a copy of the Naked Lunch soundtrack on "bug powder yellow" vinyl haha.
"I have a thousand faces and a thousand names. I am nobody I am everybody. I am me I am you. I am here there forward back in out. I stay everywhere I stay nowhere. I stay present I stay absent."

torsrthidesen
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Re: Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

Post by torsrthidesen » Sun Jul 03, 2016 10:52 am

I never liked the music in Naked Lunch (albeit, I never liked Naked Lunch. Certainly not the film and not really the novel either - Burroughs did so much better work besides it).

Though it begs the question: What music is Burroughsian? Did music ever feature in his work at all? Did he even listen to music apart from The Master Musicians of Joujouka (whose cacaphony seems ample proof the man had no musical tastes - and I love Toumani Diabate I should hasten to add as to not seem like a philistine)?
Punk, funk and or 90s hiphop has been affixed to Burroughs reputation in the latter years, but I seem to remeber reading that Burroughs was nonplussed by most of these musicians.

Didn't he listen to some spanish song on the Arena documentary? Or sing part of it. And sing something by Edith Piaf. I can't recall.

edward_de_vere
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Re: Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

Post by edward_de_vere » Sun Jul 03, 2016 6:44 pm

I never liked the music in Naked Lunch (albeit, I never liked Naked Lunch. Certainly not the film and not really the novel either - Burroughs did so much better work besides it).
The film was mostly a dud and really ought to be remade by someone who at least makes an effort to use material from the book, but you must be the only Burroughs devotee I've met who dislikes the novel. Of course, I'm probably alone here in not caring for the Red Night trilogy (except for The Western Lands).
Though it begs the question: What music is Burroughsian? Did music ever feature in his work at all? Did he even listen to music apart from The Master Musicians of Joujouka (whose cacaphony seems ample proof the man had no musical tastes - and I love Toumani Diabate I should hasten to add as to not seem like a philistine)?
Punk, funk and or 90s hiphop has been affixed to Burroughs reputation in the latter years, but I seem to remeber reading that Burroughs was nonplussed by most of these musicians.


I remember reading an interview with WSB where he was asked about his musical tastes. He said that he liked Delta Blues (Leadbelly, Muddy Waters) and Strauss waltzes. By all accounts, he had little or no interest in rock, heavy metal, punk, or any of the other genres of popular music whose luminaries often latched onto his name.

BansheeYage
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Name a Burroughs book: Junky

Re: Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

Post by BansheeYage » Tue Jul 05, 2016 12:45 am

torsrthidesen wrote:I never liked the music in Naked Lunch (albeit, I never liked Naked Lunch. Certainly not the film and not really the novel either - Burroughs did so much better work besides it).

Though it begs the question: What music is Burroughsian? Did music ever feature in his work at all? Did he even listen to music apart from The Master Musicians of Joujouka (whose cacaphony seems ample proof the man had no musical tastes - and I love Toumani Diabate I should hasten to add as to not seem like a philistine)?
Punk, funk and or 90s hiphop has been affixed to Burroughs reputation in the latter years, but I seem to remeber reading that Burroughs was nonplussed by most of these musicians.

Didn't he listen to some spanish song on the Arena documentary? Or sing part of it. And sing something by Edith Piaf. I can't recall.

Hmm that is an interesting point. I have heard what Edward mentioned below that Burroughs was a fan of Leadbelly and I've also heard of him appreciating the Harlem jazz movement and artists such as Louis Armstrong. Does it feature in his works at all? Right off the top of my head I can refer you to a part in Junky where Burroughs claims that music is great in kicking a habit. Minor feature for sure, but it is there.
"I have a thousand faces and a thousand names. I am nobody I am everybody. I am me I am you. I am here there forward back in out. I stay everywhere I stay nowhere. I stay present I stay absent."

BansheeYage
Posts: 68
Joined: Thu Mar 12, 2015 3:22 pm
Name a Burroughs book: Junky

Re: Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

Post by BansheeYage » Tue Jul 05, 2016 12:51 am

I'm surprised neither of you liked the movie adaptation. While I'm definitely on board for seeing a more faithful adaptation of the film (which due to the content of Naked Lunch I can only imagine it being animated) I don't believe Cronenberg did a bad job at capturing the conception of the book at least.

If the aim of the film was to capture the entirety of Naked Lunch then yes, I do not believe it succeeded, but I don't think that was Cronenberg's approach to it. From what I took from the film Cronenberg sought to capture the essence of the conception of the novel and add bits and pieces from the novel that were relevant to telling that story.

I wouldn't call it a flawless representation of Naked Lunch, but far from a failure.
"I have a thousand faces and a thousand names. I am nobody I am everybody. I am me I am you. I am here there forward back in out. I stay everywhere I stay nowhere. I stay present I stay absent."

torsrthidesen
Posts: 143
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Re: Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

Post by torsrthidesen » Tue Jul 05, 2016 2:47 am

edward_de_vere wrote:
The film was mostly a dud and really ought to be remade by someone who at least makes an effort to use material from the book, but you must be the only Burroughs devotee I've met who dislikes the novel. Of course, I'm probably alone here in not caring for the Red Night trilogy (except for The Western Lands).
To be honest, I never even finished the novel... :lol:
Then again, I've always had an issue with overindulgent conceptual literature. If it can't tell a story, if it can't engage, if it only is a bunch of ideas and "clever-clever" literary techniques, I quickly develop an allergic reaction.
Somehow I got through the Cut-ups. Perhaps because they're shorter and more digestible.
I always loved Burroughs theory and non-fiction more than anything else. The "WIlliam S. Burroughs Live" is my bible.

If you liked Junky and Queer, I'm surprised you didn't get the Red Night's. It definatly comes full circle. Tight, great storytelling (seeing clearly Burroughs developed love for King and Trevianan and other pulp) and a great incorporation of his ideas.

BansheeYage
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Re: Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

Post by BansheeYage » Fri Jul 08, 2016 3:10 am

torsrthidesen wrote:
edward_de_vere wrote:
The film was mostly a dud and really ought to be remade by someone who at least makes an effort to use material from the book, but you must be the only Burroughs devotee I've met who dislikes the novel. Of course, I'm probably alone here in not caring for the Red Night trilogy (except for The Western Lands).
To be honest, I never even finished the novel... :lol:
Then again, I've always had an issue with overindulgent conceptual literature. If it can't tell a story, if it can't engage, if it only is a bunch of ideas and "clever-clever" literary techniques, I quickly develop an allergic reaction.
Somehow I got through the Cut-ups. Perhaps because they're shorter and more digestible.
I always loved Burroughs theory and non-fiction more than anything else. The "WIlliam S. Burroughs Live" is my bible.

If you liked Junky and Queer, I'm surprised you didn't get the Red Night's. It definatly comes full circle. Tight, great storytelling (seeing clearly Burroughs developed love for King and Trevianan and other pulp) and a great incorporation of his ideas.
Naked Lunch had a story it was just disjointed and hallucinogenic which made extracting a conventional linear story line from it difficult. I think the best way to become fully invested in the story is to understand the construction of the novel as "routines" Burroughs would send in his letters to Ginsberg. The scathing satire and acerbic wit of NL has enabled it to stand the test of time, but those elements would not leave nearly as deep an impression without the sordid and nightmarish scenarios Burroughs portrays in the routines.

With that said, I do agree it is not one of my favorite Burrough's novels. I think the assembling of the novel caused it to suffer in quality and I don't believe that Burroughs had fully realized his abilities with that style at that time.

Stylistically I think the cut-up trilogy destroys Naked Lunch and in terms of theory I think the Red Night trilogy is some of the finest work I've ever read on the subjects of mysticism, human nature, and transcendence.
"I have a thousand faces and a thousand names. I am nobody I am everybody. I am me I am you. I am here there forward back in out. I stay everywhere I stay nowhere. I stay present I stay absent."

torsrthidesen
Posts: 143
Joined: Sun Jan 03, 2010 8:36 am
Name a Burroughs book: junky

Re: Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

Post by torsrthidesen » Fri Jul 08, 2016 1:03 pm

BansheeYage wrote:
torsrthidesen wrote:
edward_de_vere wrote:
The film was mostly a dud and really ought to be remade by someone who at least makes an effort to use material from the book, but you must be the only Burroughs devotee I've met who dislikes the novel. Of course, I'm probably alone here in not caring for the Red Night trilogy (except for The Western Lands).
To be honest, I never even finished the novel... :lol:
Then again, I've always had an issue with overindulgent conceptual literature. If it can't tell a story, if it can't engage, if it only is a bunch of ideas and "clever-clever" literary techniques, I quickly develop an allergic reaction.
Somehow I got through the Cut-ups. Perhaps because they're shorter and more digestible.
I always loved Burroughs theory and non-fiction more than anything else. The "WIlliam S. Burroughs Live" is my bible.

If you liked Junky and Queer, I'm surprised you didn't get the Red Night's. It definatly comes full circle. Tight, great storytelling (seeing clearly Burroughs developed love for King and Trevianan and other pulp) and a great incorporation of his ideas.
Naked Lunch had a story it was just disjointed and hallucinogenic which made extracting a conventional linear story line from it difficult. I think the best way to become fully invested in the story is to understand the construction of the novel as "routines" Burroughs would send in his letters to Ginsberg. The scathing satire and acerbic wit of NL has enabled it to stand the test of time, but those elements would not leave nearly as deep an impression without the sordid and nightmarish scenarios Burroughs portrays in the routines.

With that said, I do agree it is not one of my favorite Burrough's novels. I think the assembling of the novel caused it to suffer in quality and I don't believe that Burroughs had fully realized his abilities with that style at that time.

Stylistically I think the cut-up trilogy destroys Naked Lunch and in terms of theory I think the Red Night trilogy is some of the finest work I've ever read on the subjects of mysticism, human nature, and transcendence.

I'm fully aware of the "routine" aspect of Burroughs. But that's just it. The "routines" work best as routines, not as novels. They are sublime, funny and wildly inappropriate as told at parties, or in letters, small paragraphs and set ups complete with punchlines. They just don't work as novels (and this is, I hasten to add, my opinion. Just my opinion!).
And please don't misunderstand me. I love the routines. As they appear in the various collections and "scrap books", and perhaps more so in audio format, they are wonderful.
But hastily pasted together in a novel length, they are tiring. They're too conceptual to merit any novel format (and, yes, I'm a purist when it comes to novels. I like Raymond Carver. Camus. Breece D'J Pancake) and I find myself skipping sections, rest assured I will never manage to keep track or be able to make any real connection (as we know, there was none. It's just bits and pieces strapped together) which of course the beauty but eventual downfall of the dadaist. If there is no cohesion, the schtick gets old quick.
The "routines" are examples of how great a stand up comedian Burroughs would have been (and sort of became with the records).

And the "routines" - clearly - became a source of income for Burroughs in the 70s. They required little work, no real genius and could be sold to magazines, etc, for a quick buck.

It's not until Cities of the Red Night that Burroughs finally pieced together his true form. Finally, we have the great storyteller of Junky, who manages to stitch together not only the crazy and revolutionary ideas and concepts (la femme ne devrait pas exister*) and the "routines" in a way that weaves them together seamlessly. No longer disembodied schticks, but dreamscapes that exist within a grand and powerful narrative.

(Pew, I sort of went off on a routines myself there didn't I?)

*Let me know if you got the joke 8)

edward_de_vere
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Re: Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

Post by edward_de_vere » Fri Jul 08, 2016 3:53 pm

I think the assembling of the novel caused it to suffer in quality and I don't believe that Burroughs had fully realized his abilities with that style at that time.
Naked Lunch was assembled mostly at random. The individual short stories or "routines" were kept intact, but their order was mostly arbitrary. WSB mentioned that he assembled and retyped them in no particular order and sent them to the printer, and then kept that arbitrary order intact, apart from moving Hauser and O'Brien to the end.

In a sense, NL was a cut-up before the technique became "formalized," and since you have larger self-contained blocks than with Soft Machine etc. it's still more readable than the cut-up trilogy.

torsrthidesen
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Re: Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

Post by torsrthidesen » Sat Jul 09, 2016 2:18 am

edward_de_vere wrote: Naked Lunch was assembled mostly at random. The individual short stories or "routines" were kept intact, but their order was mostly arbitrary. WSB mentioned that he assembled and retyped them in no particular order and sent them to the printer, and then kept that arbitrary order intact, apart from moving Hauser and O'Brien to the end.
I always believed it was Ginsberg and someone else (I've forgotten it right now...) who assembled all the pages. But I guess it's a case of false memory.

edward_de_vere
Posts: 601
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Re: Howard Shore Soundtrack for Naked Lunch the movie reissue

Post by edward_de_vere » Sat Jul 09, 2016 11:21 am

torsrthidesen wrote:
edward_de_vere wrote: Naked Lunch was assembled mostly at random. The individual short stories or "routines" were kept intact, but their order was mostly arbitrary. WSB mentioned that he assembled and retyped them in no particular order and sent them to the printer, and then kept that arbitrary order intact, apart from moving Hauser and O'Brien to the end.
I always believed it was Ginsberg and someone else (I've forgotten it right now...) who assembled all the pages. But I guess it's a case of false memory.
Maybe my memory is muddled, but the way I remember it from the interview was that Ginsberg, Corso, and some other friend helped assemble the pages so that the pages belonging to individual routines were together (i.e. there is some contunity within individual chapters, so you don't have pages in "Benway" that belong in "Joselito" etc), but the order in which the routines (once assembled) were retyped and sent to the printers was basically random.

I think this type of inadvertent "cut up" works better than the cut and paste cut-up which, if the individual pieces are too small, renders not just pages but paragraphs and even individual sentences of gibberish as often as it results in something interesting.

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